Practice for the Sake of Practice

Why do we practice?

Not for the results. It’s called a practice because there is permission and even encouragement to explore different aspects of it without getting stuck to certain ideas or deciding on right and wrong. Obviously as the practice progresses you will prefer one way or the other, you will learn more about what works for your needs and what doesn’t.

Learning Evolves

My teaching has evolved a lot and in different ways throughout the years, according to the changes of mind and body, all along support the journey I am on and sharing. And so it will for you, if you allow it. Of course, having a teacher that understands your needs and is attentive to your progress will offer both valuable cues and guidance. We all need that from time to time as the practice unfolds.

Results Are Not What Matter

All this being said, the results are not unimportant. 

 

Do pay attention to the effects of your practice. There is information to take in, reflect on, and to explore. The learning takes place in tandem with the observations of movement (whatever the movements may be). Bring yourself to practice with a sense of open curiosity and allow spontaneity to be the baseline of practice. Settle into stillness, reset, assess and listen.

Practice

Do this in between sides before going on to the left or right side, do it in mid sequence, have yourself a savasana in the middle of practice, regroup for a moment in a seated position or a standing pose with ease and just allow for all the information to simmer down. As you return to your sequence you will engage with movement from a place of deeper awareness. The breath is your connection to the present moment where everything is happening and from where everything will unfold.

Move, reset, observe and repeat, with new perspectives and insight. This is the practice.

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About the Author:

Alexandra discovered yoga while she was in search of a connection between movement and spirituality. She’s been teaching since 2004. She’s studied many different forms of yoga and movement. She has a Master’s in behavioral science with a major in psychology. Alexandra loves studying the psychology of movement as well as the many forms of practice and she empowers and guides others to find their paths as well.